Activision Blizzard
Credit @ Activision

Activision Blizzard Sued By Family Of Employee Who Died By Suicide

According to The Washington Post, the family of an Activision Blizzard employee who committed suicide during a corporate outing, filed a lawsuit against Activision Blizzard alleging that his boss was sexually harassed and this was a major factor in the suicide. A Southern California couple whose daughter committed suicide during an Activision Blizzard employee’s three-day retreat has sued Activision Blizzard for allegedly spawning a “violent workplace sexual harassment” culture they believe that this led directly to the loss of life. After Activision Blizzard was targeted by complaints of equal pay violations, sexual discrimination, and sexual harassment, the company is now being sued by the family of one of its former employees who committed suicide in 2017.

Activision Blizzard
Credit @ Activision

Activision Blizzard was sued for manslaughter by the family of an employee who committed suicide following the alleged sexual assault of an employee who committed suicide after being allegedly sexually harassed. The developer of Overwatch and World of Warcraft has been sued by the family of an employee who committed suicide after allegedly being molested by his boss. The family of a former employee who tragically committed suicide last year filed a lawsuit against Activision Blizzard, alleging that sexual harassment played a vital role in the former employee’s death and accusing the publisher of noncompliance.

Former  employee Kerry Moynihan’s parents, former employee Kerry Moynihan, filed a manslaughter lawsuit against Activision Blizzard, alleging that harassment while working at Activision contributed to suicide in 2017 during a corporate retirement. The family says Moynihan’s sexual harassment while working at Activision Blizzard was a “significant factor” in the death.

The Court goes on to say that Activision Blizzard did not cooperate in the subsequent investigation, refusing to hand over a laptop issued by a former employee, denying access to his supervisor’s laptop and mobile phone, and suspiciously noting that Moynihans’ mobile phone had been erased. The Washington Post also reported that the complaint alleges that Activision Blizzard refused to turn over evidence such as Moynihans’ laptop or an executive’s laptop, and alleges that Restitutio tried to cover up evidence of his relationship with her after the murder, including allegedly lying to the police.

Anaheim to explain why, during the investigation of the incident, he had the hotel key card in his hotel room. The subpoena also alleges that Moynihan’s immediate manager, who has since left Blizzard, lied to Anaheim Police Department investigators about Moynihan’s relationship with the immediate manager. The document also referred to the 2017 suicide of an employee who is now at the center of her own lawsuit, as reported by Gus Garcia-Roberts and Shannon Liao in The Washington Post.