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How to Keep Your Room Cool in Summer

It is tempting to turn the A.C. on or position yourself in front of the colder months’ closest fan. But these are not the only strategies to hold things calm. There are many options to shield your home from heat without racking up the energy bill. And they are going to make you look like a do it yourself winner, too. Here is how you can keep your room cool in the scorching heat of the summer:

 

Discard the Incandescent Bulbs

 

If you ever needed the inspiration to turn to CFLs or compact fluorescent bulbs, this is it. Incandescent bulbs lose approximately 90% of their resources in the heat they generate. Throwing them to the pavement can make a slight change in cooling your house and reducing your power bill.

 

Use Your Imagination with Ceiling Fan 

 

Not only will an air conditioner send off a fake sea breeze, but this straightforward trick will do it. Fill a mixing bowl with ice or something equally cold, like an ice pack and place it at an angle in front of a massive fan so that the air blows off the ice in an extra-cold, extra-misty state. Trust us: this is magic.

 

Install Ceramic or Porcelain Tiles

 

There are a lot of specific items you can do to make your home warmer in the heat. Nonetheless, few things can tend to reduce the temperature anywhere near as far as tiles for the floor.

 

The reason tiles can help cool a home is by not storing any oil, which, as opposed to flooring surfaces like a carpet, may imply a substantial change in room temperature. Cooling your feet will make a significant change to your body ‘s temperature. Instead of introducing oil, as the carpet does, the tiles can tend to get the heat back down.

 

Use Night Wind To Your Advantage

 

During the summer months, temperatures can fall during the night. If this is the case where you stay, make the most of these relaxing hours by opening the windows before you head to bed. 

 

You can also build a wind tunnel by strategically setting up your fans to cause the ideal cross-breeze. Only make sure you shut the windows and blinds until things get too hot in the morning.

 

Use a Chillow

 

Go right to the root, and place a beautiful pillow under your bed when you are sleeping. Fill a bottle of water for your legs and place it in the freezer before placing it at the foot of your bunk. Perhaps it sounds weird, but a little dampening the sheets or tossing them in the fridge until bedtime can help you chill out.

 

Be Smart About Temp

 

Focus on the temperature of your body, not the house. If your ancestors lived without air conditioning, this is all you will do. By sipping tasty iced cocktails and adding a cold cloth and pulsed places like your collar and hands, soothing yourself from the inside out is not terrible. 

 

Some strategies involve being careful with clothing and promising the friend that you do not cuddle before the leaves continue to shift colour. Always consider holding your bed with a bowl of cold water and drop your legs if you feel warm in the middle of the night.

 

Let Your House Breathe

 

To create a cooling pressure present, open the upper section of the windows on the downwind side of your building, and open the lower part of the windows on the upwind side. 

 

Try always facing a box fan out of a window to blow away hot air, and attempt to damp the sheet and then place it in front of a second window open as a curtain for a chill-infused breeze.

 

Start Grilling Your Food

 

It is obvious, but we will say it anyway: using your oven or stove in the summer is going to make your house hotter. When you still feel like 100 degrees in your home, you want to turn on a 400-degree oven. Besides, who would not want to get more use of their grill, outdoor furniture, and seasonal accessories?

 

Be Smart With the Window.

 

Closing empty rooms would discourage cold air from entering these places during the hottest period of the day. You would still want to focus on cooler night hours, enabling air to circulate naturally into your house.

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