Microsoft Call Of Duty Nintendo
Credit @ Activision Blizzard

Microsoft Signs Deal To Bring Call Of Duty To Nintendo For 10 Years

Microsoft entered a 10-year agreement with Nintendo for Call Of Duty after the merger of Microsoft and Activision Blizzard King. Microsoft has so far failed to reach any sort of deal with Sony regarding its acquisition of Activision Blizzard, with Microsoft ultimately offering Sony a 10-year commitment for Call of Duty titles on the PlayStation systems. Sony has made clear to regulators that Sony is worried about the future of Call of Duty, and the back-and-forth public exchanges between Microsoft and Sony, mixed with the regulators expressing their concerns, has led to a more recent 10-year commitment to continue Call of Duty on PlayStation.

Microsoft Call Of Duty Nintendo
Credit @ Activision Blizzard

Microsofts game boss Phil Spencer said Tuesday night that Microsoft has entered a 10-year commitment to bring the hit title Call of Duty to Nintendo after the closure of its Activision Blizzard acquisition. The company is looking to assuage regulatory and competing antitrust concerns. Microsoft, seeking approval from the Federal Trade Commission to complete its massive Activision Blizzard acquisition, announced it has entered into a 10-year agreement with Nintendo to bring Call of Duty, for the first time after the Activision Blizzard merger.

The deals place pressure on Sony, which has been pleading with regulators in the U.S., U.K., and E.U. to block the $68.7 billion merger on anti-competitive grounds. After the announcement yesterday Serkan Toto, founder of the Kantan Games consultancy said “I think this is an attempt by Microsoft to pressure Sony into signing a deal with Activision and to make it easier for Microsoft to finish and close the deal with Activision,”.

The move comes as Microsoft is waiting on regulatory review from the FTC of its acquisition of Activision Blizzard by Sony, a rival maker of PlayStation consoles, which believes that making Call of Duty exclusively Microsoft-only would give the company an unfair edge in the video games market.

Microsoft Corp. has extended a similar proposal to Sony Group Corp., which has been trying to get Activision Blizzard Inc.s Call of Duty onto its competing PlayStation consoles for a decade, but it has been turned down so far by Sony, said Phil Spencer, Xbox head.

Xbox boss Phil Spencer tweeted out an announcement that also confirmed the company’s commitment to continuing to publish Call of Duty games simultaneously on the Valves Steam platform whenever the deal for the merger is approved. Adding further pressure to rival Sony, Microsoft on Wednesday said it too had committed to keeping Call of Duty on Steam, a digital market for PC games, under a deal with Valves.