Facebook whistleblower is optimistic about Elon Musk’s Twitter takeover and says Musk can take feedback better than Mark Zuckerberg

Frances Haugen, a Facebook whistleblower who revealed a trove of Facebook documents late last year, told Fox Business that she was “cautiously enthusiastic” about Elon Musk’s acquisition of Twitter.

In October of last year, Haugen testified before the US Congress, claiming that Facebook, which has since renamed itself Meta, constantly placed business and engagement over user safety.

Musk’s ambitions to take Twitter private could provide him the opportunity to restructure the company’s economic model to emphasize user safety over shareholder profit, according to Haugen of Fox Business.

She told the site, “I think there’s a huge opportunity here for Elon to really demonstrate that there’s another way forward.”

Haugen compared Musk to Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg, claiming that Musk is better at taking negative criticism and making substantial adjustments.

Zuckerberg has “surrounded himself with people who tell him what he wants to hear,” according to Haugen of Fox Business.

She informed the site, “I think there’s a huge opportunity here for Elon to really demonstrate that there’s another way forward.”

Musk, according to Haugen, is better at taking negative feedback and making significant changes than Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

Thus according to Fox Business’s Haugen, Zuckerberg has “surrounded himself with people who tell him what he wants to hear.”

Musk’s bid to buy Twitter for $44 billion is still awaiting shareholder and regulatory clearance, so it’s unclear what changes he’ll make to the firm. The transaction is expected to be completed in October of this year.

Musk broached the concept of removing adverts for customers to the company’s premium service Twitter Blue in a tweet before making his offer to buy Twitter. Since then, the tweet has been removed.

A whistleblower is someone who has firsthand knowledge of illegal acts in a company and reports them. Employees, suppliers, contractors, clients, or anybody else who becomes aware of illicit company practices might be whistleblowers. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and the Securities and Exchange Commission have all implemented programs to protect whistleblowers from reprisal (SEC). The Whistleblower Protection Act of 1989 ensures the safety of federal employees.

Many groups are dedicated to dealing with whistleblowing, but some specialize in particular areas of it. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), for example, is more concerned with environmental and safety infractions, whereas the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is more concerned with securities law violations. Many organizations give incentives for useful information, accept anonymous tips, and provide a variety of ways to submit data.

A corporation official or a significant governing or regulating agency may get information from a whistleblower. When high-ranking authorities and executive members of management are involved in fraud or other criminal conduct, reporting wrongdoings to a regulatory agency is the best option.

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