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Apple MacBook Pro M2 is slower than MacBook Pro M1
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Apple MacBook Pro M2 is slower than MacBook Pro M1

Apple MacBook Pro M2 is slower than MacBook Pro M1
Image Credits: Gizmodo

When a corporation releases a new product, it is often thought to be better or at least as excellent as the prior model. According to the most recent reports, the new MacBook Pro M2 appears to be slower than the MacBook Pro M1. This is not about CPU or GPU performance; rather, it is about SSD read and write speed.

According to YouTubers such as Max Tech and Created Tech, the base model of the MacBook Pro M2 with 256GB SSD delivers much worse read and write performance than the base model of the MacBook Pro M1. How slow, you ask? According to reports, the SSD in the new MacBook Pro M1 is about half as fast as the SSD in the MacBook Pro M1.

SSD Speed Test for the MacBook Pro M2

SSD Speed Test for the MacBook Pro M2

SSD Speed Test for the MacBook Pro M2
Image Credits: Gizbot

According to sources, the sequential read speed of the MacBook Pro M2(256GB) is 1,446MB/s while the sequential write speed is 1,463MB/s. Similarly, the sequential read speed of the MacBook Pro M1 (256GB) is 2,900MB/s and the sequential write speed is 2,215MB/s. As a result, the MacBook Pro M2 has a substantially slower SSD than its predecessor.

This will not be an issue if you purchase a high-end MacBook Pro M2 with 512GB or 1TB storage. According to the report, the basic model of the MacBook Pro M2 employs a single NAND memory chip, but the base model of the MacBook Pro M1 has two NAND flash chips, resulting in a decrease in read and write speed.

In reality, the higher-capacity MacBook Pro M2 models are equally as quick as the MacBook Pro M1. Even in this scenario, there is no discernible gain in read and write speeds. Does this imply that the next MacBook Air M2 will have a slower SSD as well? Time must respond.

With read and write speeds of roughly 1.4GB/s, most users will notice little change when doing routine chores. Heavy users, on the other hand, may notice a difference, especially when performing operations like video editing or rendering.

What else we know so far:

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company has apparently been contracted by the tech giant to manufacture the 3nm M3 and M2 Pro CPUs (TSMC). DigiTimes Asia, a Taiwanese magazine, reported on this.

The study also emphasized the battle between TSMC and Samsung for 3nm chip orders. The Taiwanese manufacturer will most likely begin producing 3nm chips in the second part of the year.

According to prominent tech writer Mark Gurman, the M2 Pro will most likely be utilized in the 14-inch and 16-inch Macbook Pros, as well as the high-end Mac Mini. The M3 CPUs, according to Gurman, will be utilized in a new 15-inch MacBook Air, 13-inch MacBook Air, a new iMac, and most likely a new 12-inch MacBook.

According to some sources, another chip, the M2 Max, will also be built on a 3nm technology. According to MacRumours, this processor will be suited for top-of-the-line MacBook Pro setups as well as Mac Studio.

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