EA Denies Blaming Halo Infinite
Credit @ EA

EA Denies Blaming Halo Infinite For Battlefield 2042’s Launch Problems

Electronic Arts (EA) has denied a recent report that the publisher held Halo Infinite responsible for generating negative reviews for Battlefield 2042. While EA hasn’t released any pre-sales figures for the games, earlier this week it was said that the company attributed some of the negative reviews to the launch of Halo Infinite. Speaking to employees at an internal “community” meeting, EA executives allegedly attributed some of the negative feedback about Battlefield 2042 to the surprise launch of the free-to-play multiplayer game Halo Infinites, which was on Steam around the same time.

EA Denies Blaming Halo Infinite
Credit @ EA

Speaking to staff during a meeting in the “City Corridor”, the EA government allegedly attributed some of Battlefield 2042’s malevolent practices to the shocking launch of the free-to-play multiplayer game Halo Infinite. According to an Xfires report on the meeting, EA identified a number of reasons for the poor reception of Battlefield 2042. The success of Halo Infinite quickly became the subject of denial and ridicule on the internet.

According to the Xfire’s conference version, EA acknowledged the various causes of BF2042’s problems, but the idea that EA would link Battlefield 2042’s flaws to the popularity of Halo Infinite was soon debunked and ridiculed on the internet. The surprise multiplayer launch of Halo Infinites started right over Battlefield 2042’s launch window, which would have been pretty competitive in a normal year, but the idea here is that one culprit, in particular, has been improved enough to launch, due to how Battlefield looks incredibly buggy even worse in comparison. According to Miele, the launch of the games affected Battlefield 2042 as unfavorable comparisons were made between Halo Infinite and Battlefield 2042, with Halo being perceived as a much more polished game. In identifying the reasons for the failure of Battlefield 2042, Miele put some of the blame on the huge ambitions of the project, coupled with the global pandemic, which created unexpected changes in the development process.

Laura Miele, Studio Director at EA stated that EA “failed to meet our players’ expectations and also clearly did not live up to our own expectations.” Laura Miele reportedly said internal studio DICE released their patches for day one and day zero, which meant that Battlefield 2042 “was stable” and “the first critical reception was good.”

EA Denies Blaming Halo Infinite
Credit @ EA

There may have been some disappointment that Halo Infinite came out of nowhere to paint Battlefield 2042 in a bad light, but judging by Xfires’ report of the collision, it seems like a small statement was attributed that Battlefield 2042 should have been delayed. In fact, a wave of criticism swept through the official EA Reddit sub-forum a few weeks ago. Faced with this situation, a group of users launched a campaign on Change.org asking for a refund across all platforms. Whether Electronic Arts (EA) blamed external factors or not, the fact is that Battlefield 2042 came out just a few months ago and is currently fighting to keep Battlefield 2042 alive.

In this regard, Electronic Arts Vice President for Communications John Reseburg issued a refutation of this information. EA VP of Communications John Reseburg sent clarifications to various media, explaining the true words and those comparisons to Halo Infinite that no doubt didn’t hurt. However, EA spoke out against the rumors and denied seeing anyone from the outside. What’s interesting here is that a company executive provided this helpful list of culprits for the game’s failed launch, and none of them have EA executives.

As a result, many are annoyed by DICE and EA as there is no clear roadmap for new content and updates. Mile also said that while EA received a lot of feedback about bugs and unfinished experience areas, it also received a significant amount of positive feedback from players. Of course, Battlefield 2042 has been in development for many years and not in the main release cycle of the Battlefields competitions, but maybe it’s that these games are moving too fast and cutting too many corners, and that’s the way it ends up.